Wyrtig

For gardeners with a sense of history
 

OE wyrtig, adj: Garden-like, full of plants;
On anum wyrtige hamme, Homl. Skt. ii. 30:312
.

  

Google

Home

Early gardens

Early plants

Growing heirloom plants

Garden folklore

Resources for gardeners

Site map

Contact us

 

 

 

 

 

Chamomile
Chamaemelum nobile, AKA Matricaria chamomilla

Chamomile in early sources

 

Description      Propagation      Cultivation        Harvest

Chamaemelum nobile, earlier known as Anthemis nobilis

Chamaemelum, from the Greek melon, apple; and kamai, on the ground; names this for its apple-scented foliage

Nobilis, notable, excellent

Common names, modern Chamomile, Roman chamomile, camomile, low chamomile, English chamomile, Whig plant; in Spanish, manzanilla, little apple.  
Description  
Lifespan Perennial
Hardiness  Zones 4-9
Size  3"-6"" high by 12" wide
 Habit

Chamomile has feathery, floppy stems that form a good ground cover. Its small flowers resemble little daisies.

 Flower

Bears small, daisy-like flowers on tall stems above the foliage. All-yellow flowers appear at times. 

 Foliage

Foliage is feathery but prostrate, and has a lovely, apple scent when bruised. Its stems root where they touch the ground, and the plant can become invasive if conditions are right. Chamomile self-seeds if not dead-headed.

It is used for low-traffic lawns in areas with full sun;, a very low-growing, non-flowering cultivar, "Treneague is popular for lawns and low traffic areas. 

Comments This plant takes its name from its sweet, apple-scented foliage. Chamomile tea is often used as a sleep aid and calmative, but Medline reports that Roman chamomile shouldn't be taken during pregnancy, as it may lead to uterine contractions and premature delivery.   
Propagation  
By seed  Easy from seed; can also be propagated by division
Germination temp  60-65o
Germination time  7-10 days
Moisture Keep soil moist until seed germinates
Light Requires light to germinate 
Cultivation  
Soil Prefers well-drained soil; does better without fertilizer
Moisture Once established, drought tolerant -- overwatering can lead to disease
Light Full sun to part shade
Disease, pests Generally disease- and pest-free
Season to bloom/bear Flowers midsummer to fall
Seed collection Fall, after flowers have lost their petals and begin to turn brown. Gather dried flower heads and spread to dry, then shake to harvest seed.
Comments Space 6"-8" apart; deadhead or cut off top inch to reinvigorate plants later in season. When plants die back in late fall, remove dead foliage and compost.
cultivar ‘Treneague,’ which is a non-flowering dwarf cultivar.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Chamomile Lawn Plants: Tips For Growing Chamomile Lawns https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/lawn-care/lawn-substitutes/chamomile-lawn/growing-chamomile-lawns.htm
cultivar ‘Treneague,’ which is a non-flowering dwarf cultivar.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Chamomile Lawn Plants: Tips For Growing Chamomile Lawns https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/lawn-care/lawn-substitutes/chamomile-lawn/growing-chamomile-lawns.htm
‘Treneague,’ which is a non-flowering dwarf cultivar.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Chamomile Lawn Plants: Tips For Growing Chamomile Lawns https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/lawn-care/lawn-substitutes/chamomile-lawn/growing-chamomile-lawns.htm
C. nobile is a flowering variety and not quite as suitable for a lawn substitute as the cultivar ‘Treneague,’ which is a non-flowering dwarf cultivar.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Chamomile Lawn Plants: Tips For Growing Chamomile Lawns https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/lawn-care/lawn-substitutes/chamomile-lawn/growing-chamomile-lawns.htm
C. nobile is a flowering variety and not quite as suitable for a lawn substitute as the cultivar ‘Treneague,’ which is a non-flowering dwarf cultivar.

Read more at Gardening Know How: Chamomile Lawn Plants: Tips For Growing Chamomile Lawns https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/lawn-care/lawn-substitutes/chamomile-lawn/growing-chamomile-lawns.htm
 

Home | Early gardens | Early plants | Growing heirloom plants | Garden folklore | Resources | Site map

 

Botanists are among those who know that, in spite of the rude shocks of life,
it is well to have lived, and to have seen the everlasting beauty of the world.
F.D. Drewitt

 

Copyright 2015 S.E.S. Eberly
All Rights Reserved

Contact us